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-olent environment. narrator: in the subregion of latin america called "southern south america," the country of chile is also threated by volcanoes and earthquakes. but here, pacific rim dynamism is more about economics than plate tectonics. 2,500 miles long and averaging just 90 miles wide, this elongated state spans a diverse range of natural environments. each of those environments offers opportunities for primary econom activy. each of those environments based on those activities, chile has grown a dynamic export economy. that growth has brought numero changes tohile's hum geography, incling gend rol and settlent patterns. chile's capil,antiago, is the cenof tountry's service sector, the largest partf its economy. ers inoun amic santthe resultingeupe populn tof mostly spanish colonization over several centuries. but more recently, chile'sthe prary stant foreign connecto the osideorwith europe. are best seen here, in valparaíso, chile's largest port. foreign trade is a cornerstone of the new economy, and most of it is with pacific rim countries, including the united states. man: chile has become
of the lake that has been sealed off for thousands of years? >> it is a very dark environment. there is no light from the surface. it is very cold. we think it is one of the most stable cold environment that also has a liquid water. the water in the lower lake ice is in this spiderweb network, connected in different layers from 16 meters all the way down to 27 meters. >> sounds amazing. what did you find? gregg's we drove our scores from the a lake surface. -- >> we drilled from the lake's surface. we found a syrupy brian. when we brought the brine to a surface we looked to see if there was any life. we found there was quite abundant cellular life. much to our surprise. and then we took the brine back to the lab to detect if there was metaphorically active. -- metabolic lee active. >> could it be supporting live down there, like fish, or loch ness monster? >> the only life forms we have found is a bacteria. >> what are the implications of what you found? >> this gives us a perspective that life can exist and be sustained for thousands of years without any influence from the su
. so one of the things that many of us here understand that the environment or what we call the climate influences outcomes but often times in public schools where decisions are made, climate and educational mandates are perceived as two opposite ends of the continuum, like when i have time and i've achieved my test scores and we've got everything buttoned up, then we'll get to the klie mallet. we've heard it from speaker after speaker, that conditions set the stage for children to leeb lean in and achieve. the good news is we can move bullying out of the front page not with more dollars but with more changes in our attitudes and our interactions. if more teachers perceive themselves to be call friendly and know the names of boys and girls in their buildings, part of it is reeducation that climate and environment and changing social norms is not secondary, it's primary and when we all embrace that then we'll begin to see the changes in the policies and the practices and we'll begin to get the results we want. we need to advocate for improving the social climates of our public school
and the department of the environment is here as well (railroad noise). >> yes and all positive activities. the railway station is historic and it will remain that way, so again welcome to heron's head park. by the way for those of you who don't know why it's named this way is because if you ever have a chance to get above this area and see it literally is shaped like a heron's head and this is part of the honoring of our waterfront area. it's a great investment and of course it will lead me to say with the responsible, and this year is our proposition b which extends another great investment of $195 million to many other areas including the south east sector of open space that we got to take care of, and modernize. this is what rec and park does very well with dpw with all of the capital leadership in the city that i got to work on with the city administrator. we need to take care of the infrastructure in many ways and we are loving our parks and why we want this great investment to continue and this is another small yet important addition. we will have $35 million more of that with t
an incredibly difficult political environment and a really challenging fiscal environment as well and that's put a ton of pressure on adhering to the pledge. >> stephen: isn't grover norquist going to bring down the hammer on these guys come midterms? >> it's very hard to say because in some places-- for example south carolina and georgia-- that's very possible. but you have to understand --. >> stephen: real america. >> exactly. but, you have to understand -- hey, i'm from brooklyn, my friend. that's real america, too. (cheers and applause) >> stephen: no, excuse me, calm down, that's "real" america. it's ironic patriotism. >> america has changed a n a lot of ways over 20 years. one of the big changes is that we have a lot more people over the age of 65. and republicans, like democrats, like programs like medicare and social security so when you have a lot more old people, those programs get more expensive and that means that it's hard to keep tax levels exactly where they have been during the bush years. >> stephen: that's fine. but why is this happening publicly. why are people like lindsey g
to concentrate and learn. so a school safety environment is no. 1 and we know that when you have that safe environment it's backed up by respect and trust, students will learn better, they will attend school better and academically they will do well and socially they will do well. so socially we're very concerned about implementing at the ground level these laws tom has led the way in enacting. >> but there are a lot of people who don't think this is an issue, unfortunately, sadly. i know you are a big believer in this in mental health and good physical health and the link to academics. could you talk about that, please? >> all the research points to having a healthy school environment, having health in your life, many students, a quarter of our students in california have poverty, a quarter of our children have no health care. what was a million students a year and a half ago is now a million and a half. when you have good nutrition and good health, you will learn better. it goes hand in hand with good mental health and a good school environment. the research points out, we want our k
's a healthy environment and bullying prevents that for so many kids. when terreesa and i addressed issues around truancies and one of the common themes and i saw this before with sexually exploited cases and kids were afraid to go to school because of the terrorism going on and with bullying it's flat out terrorism for the victim and the recipient of it. our efforts are strong because we don't want kids to feel that the only choice is don't go to school or find a new school to go to and also gave us the opportunity to look at the children that are bullied and what is going on in their house or family and why are they acting out to an aggressive, mean way? and it opened up a lot of doors for us and our initiative is take this head on to make sure children feel safe and they are safe and our challenge is the introduction of the internet and social media and can be so insidious behind closed doors. the governor signed a bill into law and my office and the l.a. county sheriff have committed to keeping track and data of crimes that occur involving the internet or social media because we fran
a horrible environment but it is still getting better. it is getting better because taxes are going to go up? >> good god no. that's not going to help things. it will make them worse. and there is a mild improvement. i would hope for a strong improvement. i don't expect to see it. and what has just been done is not going to improve things. sadly, it will make california even less competitive than before. neil: voters must have known that was the talk and advertising against these propositions when they started? >> well they --. neil: obviously voters thought otherwise. >> hard to know what they think. i thought i, i used to think i knew but, in the old days they were not crazy about taxes but i think there's been a shift. i think more and more people think they will not have to bear the burden. and therefore, why not. and the other thing was that frankly governor brown used education as a hostage, saying that it was necessary to avoid almost 6 billion in cuts to education. i don't accept that. there were a lot of things he could have cut. there are a lot of things that are not necessary and
down the exterior of the building. so imaging that this will be a very calm environment when it comes to controlling wind. and it also allows us to address the whole issue of how to avoid birds flying into the structure. that extra depth and and keeping the birds from hitting the building. if you look across first street you see one of the key retail lobbies of the center at the street level. and you see the entrance to parking and you see the relationship between the north edge of the transit center and the south edge of the tower. now, you are standing across mission street. at the corner of mission and freemont. once again you see the heavier metallic work at the base of the tower and you see the grove of redwoods and the sculpture at the corner and you see how lively and prominent that is going to be and i think that it is welcoming public presence in the streets of san francisco. and you are now looking directly across mission street, the tower is on your right and the grove of redwoods are inviting you to enter the center and immediately on access in front of you are the two mai
, a waterfront design sensitive to the views and the environment that we want to have, and a great, great addition to our economy in the city for years and years to come, so it is with great pride that we make this announcement because many of the people in this room are looking for that opportunity from all walks of life, from every community in san francisco they see this as a city wide projected, not just on the waterfront. it's everybody's future. everybody has to be heard and i know that even this weekend there was a telephonic ability to talk to people online and the telephone. there were over 4,000 people that engaged themselves with a conversation and the warriors and about what this project meant. it's incredible. i also want to give a shout out to the port and i know monique is here and they're working hard with our team and continuing this ongoing dialogue and we will have more announcements to make. right now this is just the beginning of this project but it's a great beginning because usually when people talks about jobs and who gets to work on the project and i know su
not communicate with the officers. they are in a precarious situation. they worked at a much closer environment and they cannot be perceived as a snitch. or that they are working with the police department. they are there to, down, emotionally, the anchor. what they do then, we have a shooting war homicide. and they go to the hospital to be with the families. any talk of retaliation -- they will work with our social workers at the hospital. and whether the retaliation must go next. to saturate and prevent and interrupt any violence that may occur. this is a component or peace that has been building. i polled the captains of payview, mission, ingleside and the northern district. these are the most affected by gang violence. they said they appreciated what the crn did what they want to see them more. they need to fill that communication. it also comes down to training and trust, to be able to have them talk to officers. they would address the officers, they had arrested some of them, when there were actually under. they will help the police and the community. under his guidance we are the most ac
is a matter of social justice. but if we can't have environments where students feel comfortable attending school, being comfortable with themselves and in themselves in a school environment we will never have students that are predicated in a way to be able to learn. we have to have safe schools. so what we did this year, when all of our administrators came back from summer break, every administrator from principals to the purchasing manager, everyone saw bully this year. and we spent a full year with our bifl department of student, family and community resources, we spent a full day debriefing that movie and going through a process where we talked about it and it was amazing to see grown adults having these realizations about what bullying meant to them and having a commitment from every administrator in our district that we will not allow that to happen this year and that will be one of the focus areas this year. so the ability to have these children now watch the movie as well was extremely moving to us yesterday. i just have to share one anecdote from that movie. we had a question
practice in the environments they're in all the time outside of school. >> and i would say that having listened to the word "media literacy" as far as back when i was carrying 3-inch quarter cassettes years ago and it was a great job. it really was. to teach media and digital literacy out of context is a fool's error and we have the boring curriculums in the world and teaching it out of the context. >> we have to stop blocking. >> yeah. i don't know. >> somebody -- okay. >> teachable moment. >> i hear everybody talk about -- >> thank you. >> yeah. so i have learned the phrase "teachable moment" since becoming a resource officer and i try to incorp rat that with a discipline situation and i try to use the teachable moment with the parents as well so you can move forward all together instead of just making everybody upset. >> i have some comments actually responding to what you asked about, the zero tolerance and different proposallity. one of my colleague and looked at this across the last 15 years and noticed a trend what we called "net widening and net deepening" and more behavi
, then the environment has to change so the virus cannot grow and the only way the environment changes is if youth and adults begin to speak with one voice about changing the social norms that allows it to happen. it makes sense to most of us, you have it khaifrpb the social norms. we must educate. but we must go beyond thinking more rigor will get us better achievement. we have to remember a school is a community and in a xhuept, people look out for each other. they've got each other's back. how do we begin to promote that idea that we are in this thing together? we believe it's through, unfortunately but truly, self-interest. kids are driven developmentally by the desire to fit in, to belong, to be part of an affinity group. if we can capitalize on their desire to look out for their friends and give them some more tools and opportunities and support, they will begin to do what we need them to do to at least confront it in their own small cell of social influence and the compounding and leveraging of that begins to make change. so the question we have to ask ourselves, are we as adults willin
punitive measures because we don't believe in that. we mean that every classroom, every school environment should be a safe environment where everyone is welcomed regardless of who you are, regardless of your ethnic background, sexual orientation or cultal
, which is hey in the united states if we are looking at this social environment, if anything those factors are going to contribute to more and more diversity. so it's a real, real difficult question, how we relate to new religious movements? how, labeling is not the term i am really looking for but how we understand them in relationship to other people rather, maybe we are talking about a continuum. maybe we don't say sect and cult but we have sort of a continuum of tension, as janet pointed, out with the dominant species that is concerned about the - about resources. and that's a good point. yes, susanna? >> but when you go up to that temple and i haven't been there for probably two or three years now so i am a little fuzzy. but what i remember is the beauty of course of the grounds and the building. but then the videos that you see do contribute to, a bit i thought to his, misconception that it is a joining of all faiths. because in the building, they give space to other great faiths, they give histories of other great faiths. and i came away thinking that possibly it was the bah
of the environment and currently environmental law, but also as a resident of the city. the attempt with the new draft e-i-r impact report characterizes the golf course as unacceptable and has been refuted that san francisco historic advisory commission when there is a clear disagreement such as this, it is a clear indicator that a separate evaluation for the alternative plan is necessary to maintain [speaker not understood], almost done, and the endangered species within it. [speaker not understood] procedural resolution to ensure that the department up holds [speaker not understood] the golf course project from the natural area plan and allows for the environmental review. a yes vote will pave the way for the protection of humans and wildlife [speaker not understood] areas to rely -- >> thank you very much. >>> thank you so much. >> thanks a lot. good job squeezing it all into. >>> good afternoon, supervisors. my name is johnny baldini and my comment is in regards to the recreation and parks department, significant natural resource area management plan for which a final draft plan was approved
of our preferences or the inability to control our preferences. we are victims of our environments growing up. we are victims of our context that we live in and, therefore, we all, you know, are not "responsible for that behavior and therefore should be mitigating." when you look at the testimony that comes in, whether it's from a mother or from neighbors or from teachers that are talking about really mitigating circumstances, they are the rotten social background kind of arguments, the abuse and the suffering that that individual experienced and those things show up in the brain. the brain is also a sponge. the brain isn't simply created by genetics and it's very much shaped by environment. and so my mentor john monaghan likened the problem of predicting violent people to predicting violent storms. when you think of meteorology, you think of the difficulty of classifying a hurricane and tracking a hurricane, making judgments about such complex behavior that has sort of chaotic premises underlying it, you're going to make lots of mistakes. you're going to make lots of mistakes in b
that produce the evidence-based are done in a sort of a cocoon environment that doesn't mirror, and then the research findings are reported in scientific studies that nobody reads or very few people read: a) because people don't have the time, b) because we almost purposely use language that nobody understands. so, unfortunately, i think these are key limitations to the real translation of research to practice in the field, and not just in behavioral health. dr. peterson, is that true for prevention as well? yes, i would say it is true for prevention as well. there are people who work in real-world settings who are interested in helping prevent problems from occurring-in this case, substance abuse or mental health issues-and they have a lot of constraints on their time. they have a lot of constraints on other resources-could be money, could be technology. and, in terms of bringing research to practice, things that are done in a laboratory or academic setting, if you will, sometimes are not readily translatable into real-world settings with those constraints happening and with a
is adopted. item 26. >> clerk calvillo: item 26 is a resolution authorizing the department of environment to retroactively accept and expend a grant in the amount 400,000 from the u.s. department of environment, environmental protection to support brown fields assessment projects. >> president chiu: same house same call? this resolution is adopted. item 27. >> clerk calvillo: item 27 resolution authorizing the department of emergency management to retroactively accept and expend a fiscal year 2012 program grant in the amount of 29 million from the us department of homeland security through the california emergency management agency for the periods of october 12, 2012 through may 31, 2014. >> president chiu: same house same call, the resolution is adopted. >> clerk calvillo: item 28 a mast lease extension for the department of ha public health n mission street for approximately 32.36 million per month with annual increases. >> president chiu: same house same call, this resolution is adopted. next item. >> clerk calvillo: item 29 is a resolution authorizing the department of public health t
contribution to the local business environment and the local economy. last september, we learned that the regulations for entertainment permits for karaoke recently changed and we moved immediately to try to move festa into compliance with the current regulations, we filed the application right away, unfortunately i had to leave for europe almost immediately after, but we worked closely with the commission throughout and we completed i think all the necessary inspections and approvals from the city departments including the police department, the fire department, building including basic building and electrical, public health and the planning department. we also completed a fairly extendbacker extensive outreach program per the good neighbor policy, we talked with a large number of the surrounding businesses in the same building and masae's also made contact with people who are living in the immediate vicinity, and they gave very nice favorable comments on festa. i would like to say by the way, we very much appreciated the commission's help and guidance as we moved through this
and education about our waterfront, about the environment, about the balance of nature, and in the urban setting and of course it not have happened on the theme i will talk about the rest of my administration which is the team work that has to happen. we have rec and part that administers the bond. we have the port with its staff and byron and susan reynolds and working with public works to open up this area with the private sector whether it's ledge or the park advocates or the green space or the blue green advocates and this is all connected when i was taught during my dpb days and we had people walk along the water way and experience the wonderful, wonderful initial resources that we had, so all of these investments. >> >> will bring a lot of great use of open space to this area and not to forget we have a little off lease dog run that is also added in hee
of operating environment that we do, mostly in mixed traffic, is going to make that 85% number difficult to achieve, even with all the investment that we have. however, we believe that this level of core funding, this $250 million a year level, will have a significant impact on muni performance and not just the ontime performance, but the spacing of the buses, the reliability of the buses. and i'm going to talk a little more about that. you know, would we like to have twice as much funding, could we do a lot more with more funding, yes. we are trying to be smart and strategic with the resources that we have, recognizing that we're not going to have $500 million a year to build a new subway station for every station under market street at the end of its useful life. we're trying to be strategic and focus on things that will directly impact transit performance. >> supervisor wiener: i understand. i think the question and the point i think we're agreeing on is that the current plan level of investment is not going to sort of complete the task, in terms of getting muni's vehicle fleet into t
the bidding environment for our contractors. it's remarkable what she has done. >> been a public service -- being a public servant is a good thing. i love my job. i would never exchange it for anything else in the world. [applause] [applause] >> i am from the department of public works. i have the honor of introducing jocelyn quintos. i will just a real quick, jocelyn works very hard. through her work, a lot of contracts and a lot of work that she does -- she has brought new systems that have saved a lot of tand time and allowed us to give contracts and make payments very fast. please meet jocelyn. [applause] >> first of all, i just want to thank spur and mfac for giving me this honor. i've never really won an award. it does feel like you won the oscars. it's different when you are standing here. i do not even have a written speech. i will speak from the heart. today is a very important day for me and my family because this happens to be my father's death anniversary. i want to dedic
in this environment and continue to proceed and be successful. i mean it when we say -- what we end up doing is so different. we work to scale every day. we invite the people that we serve every day. thank you to the nominees. to our leadership, thank you. thank you to all the winners and to all the people we get to work with and serve. thanks. [applause] >> let's hear it for the tax team. [applause] >> parking is a universal quality of life issue. it touches on so many different parts of the transportation system. we were looking for ways to make parking easier and more convenient. >> in the beginning, we looked at parking throw san francisco, and her desire to price parking based on demand is how it started. >> for 70 years, we've used flat meter rates and short time limits. that did not always work so well. it did not make it easier to find a parking space. sf park has two main components. the whole point is to get them off the road quickly. and to create more of an spaces. we're doing the man-responsive pricing. we're obligated to find the lowest rate possible. generally, most of the time, the
creates a welcoming environment for everybody. there is no cultural barrier to entry. >> the demographic of people who come will match the demographic of the reader. it is very simple. if we want more people of color, you book more people of color. you want more women, your book more women. kind of like that. it gets mixed up a little bit. in general, we kind of have a core group of people who come every month. their ages and very. we definitely have some folks who are straight. >> the loyal audience has allowed michelle to take more chances with the monthly lineup. established authors bring in an older audience. younker authors bring in their friends from the community who might be bringing in an older author. >> raider has provided a stage for more than 400 writers. it ranges from fiction to academics stories to academic stories this service the underground of queer fell, history, or culture. >> and there are so many different literary circles in san francisco. i have been programming this reading series for nine years. and i still have a huge list on my computer of people i need to ca
environment. and can you having to the point, san francisco featured very prominently was [speaker not understood], with urban ar tour and urban gardens, was shared space. many of the projects were identified by name and our own, our very own david winslow was featured when he was participating as a private architect with linden alley. this is just one of many, it was beautifully put together, all the design, [speaker not understood]. and i was really proud. and i hope that somewhere on the web all of you will take a moment to see how good we looked. >> commissioner sugaya. >> another piece from the chronicle. it's actually sunday datebook and it's in their way back machine column. this goes back to 1987, november 20th. i'll just read it. it is pertinent to the planning process. it says "november 20th, czar -- charlotte [speaker not understood] has lost the fight to prevent her neighbor from blocking her view of golden gate bridge. san francisco board of appeals by a 5 to 0 vote reversed a planning commission -- reversed a planning commission vote against the fourth floor rooftop a
into an environment of heavy balls or light balls? heavy balls. and you want the thing to slow down. let me ask you this. if i take a ball and i throw it against a brick wall-- [makes sounds] --when it bounces off, will it bounce off a lot slower or about the same? about the same. about the same. if i take a golf ball and i throw it against a bowling ball, is that bowling ball gonna slow the golf ball down? no, it's not. so what you do is you take the golf ball and you throw into an arena of ping-pong balls. and if you do that, it will give what? give the energy to ping-pong ball and it itself will slow down. and so what do you do is you take these things and you bounce them off atoms like the size of carbon. did you ever hear about the heavy water? you bounce them off light atoms or molecules and these things will slow down, so they're moderated and will cause the reaction of more of this fission. you call--nuclear fission, gang, breaking apart, nuclear fission, and you will fission more atoms. anyway, this is something that cause an awful lot of excitement. because along with these two, it turns
and environment for business. how many businesses are leaving the state because theye ovtaxed or overburdened or overregulated, whatever it is. what is the net there. home values whether rising falling and unemployment. they're trying to make the overall point it is a death spiral for a state when you have more people in the cart than pulling the cart. is that -- >> absolutely. melissa: is that correct? >> that is absolutely it. that is probably the best indicator of all. a lot of credit ratings really lag reality. if you have a high income state. you then raise your taxes like maryland just did, very similar o california, so you really collecting a lot of taxes the bond ratings agencies say you're pretty good. what they don't realize they rent u-haul trucks in those states and eventually people leave. in the short term they don't leave but in the long term theyon't come. and those that can leave will. melissa: you kno, people will write in make the point when you're talking about pensioners like we were in the lt segment, these people paid in at one time to call them takers now isn't fair.
in this new environment that we find ourselves in post-election and particularly with respect to the susan rice piece which is -- ha, gender, all these little sexy pieces to it, how do republicans that you're hearing see that? >> it's interesting. i was talking amazingly to more democrats yesterday. they said we just want to have a fight on the floor. we just don't want to have this thing where you can stick something and say i've got a hold on it and nothing happens. we want the american people to have to actually watch. if they don't want susan rice, let them stand on the floor and actually have to talk about it so that the world will see it. and then the people can judge. but it's not like that now. you just stick something in a closet. >> so what's the possibility of their actually being filibuster reform? this comes up after every election cycle. what's so special about now that makes it possible that the republicans and democrats will come together and do this? >> i think there's so much pressure on harry reid to do something. he can do it by himself with his own party's votes. if he
, the ryan airs, who continue to take market share and operate in a more difficult economic environment much more so than the flag carriers. however starting to look at the flag carriers again, in particular lufthansa. the iberian side of it will drag earnings down for quite a long time. air france still has significant employment issues. and if you're looking for a relatively undervalued, company which is taking itself and do significant cost cutting which i think it will bring through, you have conglomerate discounted lufthansa. it makes it a more interesting stock. >> at a time when europe doesn't have a lot of demand strength, if we're talking about reducing capacity, that means higher ticket prices and perhaps germany being one place where businesses can afford to pay up. >> i think that it's an element of probably relatively small part of overall. these are global businesses. they need to have global growth. but that is an interesting point for next year. >>'s most important for global demand then? >> with airlines it's about oil prices, in terms of capacity and reduced capacity. and i
in this environment inevitable? >> let me just say our prayers are with president bush and i hope he has a speedy recovery. we have had cut after cut after cut in education in the last four years. in this recessionary environment most of the dollars in education are local and state dollars and we have seen 300,000 teacher layoffs, we have seen class sizes spiraling up and this is for the kids who need it most. what the federal dollars in education go for i really targeted programs like early childhood education, when we know that is important, 100,000 kids who get it now wouldn't get it. title i funds go for helping kids to learn how to read in urban areas, something that is absolutely essential. right now because of all the cuts we have had if you had mid year cuts in education like this, we see a lot of kids being hurt. connell: everybody says we need a strong military to be the united states of america but times have changed, there's more technology, the types of wars we have i have changed but me we could have a strong military few spend money in a smart way. in a similar case a lot of credit
, or the environment or national defense, or... whatever. we have to go through those choices. we can't have everything we want. that's an issue that will be an issue for employees and employers. how much of your take-home pay-- what could be your take-home pay-- do you want going into medical premiums? and if you really want to put a cap on it, recognize that that will mean some things-- which are of benefit, but more marginal benefit than other things-- won't be available. the question is can we make such decisions and stick to them? alex capron: i think we could get to the point where we face those decisions and make the kinds of decisions which seem justified enough that they can stand up to those difficult cases. they won't collapse the first time a child with an appealing face doesn't get some treatment that would be lovely if he could get, because it's ranked low enough in our value system, given what benefit the child would get, that it's not going to be made available, and not have that front-page story tear at our heart strings and say, sure, give the child the treatment, because once we do t
environment as well as just the local ecology, he was a founder of a lot of those fields and we feel that he describes kind of our concept as well as just sort of what we're about there. >> okay. what i was saying is that i'm glad someone's taking on the purple onion, the purple onion was e clastic, it's an important venue, i'm glad you're improving it, i'm glad you are recreating it into something wonderful, i'm glad you're considering musical groups like the students and that you're going to continue doing comedy. sound like you have a lot of work in front of you. bringing it up to ada access is a lot of work. do you have any idea when you might open? >> i can optimistically tell you a date but i know i will not hit that date. i think, you know, we are going for june, but that can easily push to late summer, if not beyond, you know, our plans have all been finalized, we are in the permit process right now. we are waiting for the historic preservation society's green light, they have verbally okayed it, we're going to issue two separate permit, one for internal and one for exterior so we're
a comfortable listening environment with high ambient noise. they also offer a cable with a microphone and controller and also music. go to www.kron4.com and 'enter to win'.... now for today's market update... some good news on wall street.. as stocks end the day higher on news that lawmakers are possibly inching towards a deal to avoid a fiscal crisis at the end of the year. the dow gained more than 100- points to close just shy of 13-thousand. the nasdaq jumped up 24-points. and the s-and-p-500 rose 11 points. >> betty white is putting herself up on the auction block. she is a supporter for animal rights it begins on monday. a scuffle breaks out at an n-b-a game. gary shows you ahead plus - 49ers coach jim harbaugh really. has two starting quarterbacks. gary has those stories, and all the sports, next (car horn) paying with your smartphone instead of cash... (phone rings) that's a step forward. with chase quickpay, you can send money directly to anyone's checking account. i guess he's a kicker... again, again! oh, no you don't! take a step forward and chase what matters. ♪ you can
hard to let her do the things she wanted to do and keep it in a safe environment that we had some control over. and that was a difficult task and we worked long hours discussing it with her and what we felt was important and how she should behave. >> what went through my mind was initially the feeling that she was a teenager, i knew jill was very strong in hr personality and i knew that she was a good kid, a really good -- both my daughters are great kids. she was just exploring her sort of self-identity and i saw it as a way for her to become independent so i supported it. but it frustrated me that she was pushing away from the family. >> the day jill died i walked into her bedroom to wake her up around 11:00 am and i walked in and the dogs jumped up on the bed and she said a sweet hello to me. and i said i was concerned because she was sleeping late and i thought she should get up and get started on her day, because it was sunday. >> i came home and saw jill had been, she was awake and she was talking but she wouldn't talk to me. i thought she was just mad because i cut her
that caused a hostile environment that adults knew of, should have known of and knew of and done something about it, is about ensuring that the culture that gives rise to that is eradicated. so our resolutions are about mining the data in detail so that you know not just what's happening but who feels comfortable saying it and how they are going about trying to remediate it. it is about doing climate checks because unless adults consistently talk to their student body and understand you don't know whether it's getting better. in lots of instances in our resolutions it's also been about ensuring that there was a community school leader committee on campus to help deal with some of these issues, to do things like peer to peer orientation because, for example, we know sexual harassment and sexual violence happens most frequently in the early days of the school year during things like orientation week. and it's also about ensuring that we realize the school day doesn't just end at 3:00. extra can urricular activities, partnerships between local law enforcement. >> tom, back to the question
there for the long-distance carriers. so, that is a change to the environment in that area. and you do need to go out to the locals. the other thing is because of the... there are two properties that we were not even going to touch now we have to work either to preserve one of them is got a historical significance, and we will work underneath it to protect it. but again, this has not... the owners of these properties need to have a chance for a say. the vent structures we want to make sha clear and because they are above ground structure and they vent smoke. they may never vent smoke. we may never have a train fire. i prefer that to be the case. but certainly a lot of transit projects and other cities have had problems with vent structures and people, and we have done our best to provide some preliminary designs which we think will get rid of those concerns. >> those are good examples. i was just curious, thank you. >> director metcalf? >> i am really glad that we are talking about the extension of the cal train i am hope thating we spend more time as a board on this. i have no concerns whatsoever ab
in an environment that meets the security requirements. but the key phrase from the senator, if the political will exists. republican senator john mccain for one says moving the detainees to the united states is not such a good idea. >>> i have great ob jeks to it. i think it would be basically insertion of authority that is clearly not with violation of the existing laws. >>> while senator fine stein talked about cost savings involving kwguantanamo. what do you do with the detainees? the president ordered the closure of gaun tan me b-- guantanamo bay almost four years ago. >>> let's head over to janice dean. she is here with the first degree weather update. >> it is cool out there but we have the coldest spot of the map 20 in maine, 23 in minneapolis. warmest spot los angeles. we are expecting a warm-up across the plains. our alaska forecast ann bailey said we need more alaska. love for alaska. current temperatures minus 28 in fairbanks. it's chilly. satellite radar imagery across the west. we could see 6-10 even 12 inches of rainfall and wind gusts in excess of 70 miles per hour especially
. there are better uses for this small building which would be more sensitive to the environment and the neighborhoods. a good use would be as a soccer clubhouse for the kids. rec and park just got 200 million that would be a drop in the bucket. if they don't want to do it i would be happy to fund it myself. why would -- why would you want to put a modest rental income ahead of the welfare of the children of san francisco. there is a use -- nuisance impact on marina boulevard residents most of what face the marina green, to have a restaurant open 'til 9:00 or 11:00 is just wrong. thank you. >> supervisor farrell: thank you very much. next speaker please. >> morning. marijuan.i'm maureen gafny. when i was contacted with rec and park regarding a reroute of the bay trail in order to facilitate a waterfront restaurant i thought, great, we're going to -- assuming we would be asked to move the trail off of the shoreline. to my delight the bay trail will be moved closer, and it is the building that will move inland. this is a fine model and should be used around the bay starting with so
the important things, they are all from pretty average environments. extremely different in terms of structure. does this go towards mitigation? how should it be used? how should this information be used to? i use it to dole out treatment. that is how i thought we would kick start this seminar. i am happy to answer any other questions. i did not do this all by myself. i had a lot of individuals who helped me with this data. this research is all funded by the national research of health, your tax dollars. thank you for your attention. i will turn over to our moderator. thank you. [applause] >> actually, i would like to, i'm going to ask a few questions, but i was hoping we could get a debate going here rather than with me trying to ask intelligent questions and just have the very smart people just talking amongst themselves to educate us. so one of the questions that we're wanting to talk about today was the idea of free will in terms of the criminal justice system. and i would like to ask each of you, is there a definition of free will in the context of your individual work? we'll start with y
needs to be return odd to a safe environment in her group home. there is no new information and needs to be returned. brian flores ktvu channel 2 morning news. >>> oakland police are investigating the death of a man who was found shot inside his car. officer found the victim just after 8:00 last night. they went there after hearing gunshots in the area and the victim was pronounced dead at the scene and so far no arrests have been made. >>> well the second storm is headed for the bay area right now and this will be stronger than that first one. and along the great highway, they are talking about flooding they are worried about out there, alex? >> reporter: along the great highway, we are near the ocean beach area and that's that first round of rain which did create some street flooding and when you look, the roadway is drying out this morning. a much different scene yesterday though when the national park service was forced to close down the road because there was too much water that was pooling in this area. a man drove through the intersection and his car stalled out part way throu
votes here. who want to put the environment and the welfare of the children ahead of the dollars of a restaurant lease. do the right thing. and vote against this restaurant lease on december 4. and with all due respect, supervisor farrell, i ask you again, with the association, with the hospitality industry, and$á( mz your own father pitchg this restaurant, do the decent and honorable thing and recuse yourself from this vote. thank you. >> president chiu: i want to remind the public there's a rule in the board chamber that we not address individual members in your public comment. if you could address all your comments to the full board. thank you. >> hi. i'm nichole preato i'm a resident on marina boulevard. thank you. hi. i recently found out -- we all recently found out about the proposal to agree to a lease -- a restaurant lease on the marina green. and we're quick to action. we presented yesterday, and we're here finding out we can do this again tonight to speak to all of you. first of all, late notice on this very important decision, it's greens are open space, our beautifu
to the environment and community would be to use the degaussing station as a clubhouse for the kids so they have shelter, restroom facilities, and a place to store their equipment. if rec and park doesn't want
for improvement and identifies the funding environments. amtrak ridership set a record last year as they indicated. and with an aging population higher gasoline prices and the total instability of the fuel resources, highway and aviation congestion, millions of more travelers choose to ride the train if the service is available and dependent. amtrak workers are prepared and well trained to provide services to our customers, but for us to succeed congress must provide amtrak with consistent and predictable multiyear funding for modernization and capacity upgrades. beyond reorganization, what amtrak really needs is dramatic increases in capital investments. amtrak's next generation plans for the northeast corner is outstanding. it will cut the transaction it time in half between washington and new york, as well as between new york and boston. they need to increase speed and updecorate the infrastructure is the ticket to transporting americans in an cost effective and energy efficient matter. we and labor are ak -- amtrak's partner. we -- if they so see the need but more importantly, the substantial
environment and the latest quarter, incredibly strong. blucerchiati, off the 62 cents faces and better than expected revenues. how many of those have you had? and all this is happening despite the fact trimmable gets half of it's revenues from overseas. they have serious european exposure. it doesn't seem to be hurting. the forecast is for the country to grow up 15 to 17% over the next five years. i don't know many companies like that. the vast majority of that is coming from organic growth and those are terrific numbers but they are not pie in the sky numbers. this gives them a competitive edge. when you have something like that you can take market share left and right or raise prices dramatically, either way, you can krish the estimates. the number of analysts that covered him think the company's technology is necessary for their customer's survival. only a couple players you can say that about. sales force.com, apple. market for their measurement and equipment is very underpenetrated especially in europe with 22% penetration and asia with 12% penetration. sales force.com had good numbers
family" environment. >> they're bringing analog to digital campaigns. voter turnout has changed dramatically as the under class, minorities are starting to vote at this point. and it's changed the whole electorate -- >> look at your state, tom. northern virginia, who has a lot of single women. they come to work in washington. some get married, some don't. they stay there. they work all their lives in washington but necessity live across the river. they vote democrat generally, right? >> yeah, particularly those who are in toward the city. >> what's that about? how are you going to get them back? >> single women across the country have been voting more and more democratic. married women tend to vote more republicans. i think you get them back with policy, optics are important. republicans understand that. it's a long -- there's no silver bullet for it. >> you should have run condoleezza rice years ago. senator for california could have been condi rice. >> i want to give you free advice. i don't think you should refer to the underclass. that's a dated word. that's not who we're ta
to be able to be done, especially in this environment, to be honest. >> suarez: representative, you just heard the senator lay out why time is of the essence. is time also of the essence in a political sense? do you have to do this in calendar 13 before the congress gets caught up in the midterms for 2014? >> look, tomorrow, the next session, the next month, the next term, those aren't words. it's now. the latino community spoke clearly and eloquently and forcefully and in a unified fashion across this nation. and i say to my colleagues in the republican party it is time that we listen to the electorate. and they spoke very clearly. look, a couple of things just very quickly: everyday we deport a thousand people. that's 30,000 a month. let me just make it clear: tens of thousands of people are going to be deported this year who have american citizen children. they can't wait for piecemeal. we have a stem industry that needs workers today. think about all this talk about uncertainty and uncertainty and how that has an impact, a negative impact on our economy. let's take the uncertainty aw
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